The Art of Pacing by Feel

The key to a personal best is having the patience to control your first lap speed and match it closely with the remaining laps. This requires an athlete to develop the skill of pacing that will be built from experience.

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The Art of Pacing by Feel.

Pacing your laps is the best way of getting that next 1-mile personal record. Personal records in the mile are historically performed by a fast first lap, 2 slightly slower laps, and a fast final lap.

Pacing by Feel Workout:

Set 1: 5x200m w/ equal rest between reps, Rest 5min

Set 2: 4x300m w/ equal rest between reps, Rest 5min

Set 3: 3x400m w/ equal rest between reps, DONE!!

Total: 3400m

Workout Pacing

All intervals will be performed at your recent 1-mile max effort time. As an example, an athlete that recorded a 1-mile time of 8min will target their 200s in 1min, their 300s in 90sec, and their 400s in 2min. This athlete will take 1min rest between 200s, 90sec rest between 300s, and 2min rest between 400s. See below for further tailored pacing guidance based on your mile time (pacing here).

Workout Details

This workout is for the athlete that wants to focus on the skill of pacing by feel. The first interval of every set will be performed while checking your pace every 100m. As an example, the athlete with the 8min PR would validate his or her pace target by reaching every 100m checkpoint in 30sec, 200m in 60sec, etc.

The athlete is not allowed to look at their watch on any other intervals until they cross the finish line.

Each athlete will use his or her first interval time as the target for all remaining intervals in each set. The goal is to match the finishing times in the remaining intervals to the starting interval finishing time. Athletes will quickly learn that the body is able to quickly adapt and replicate an established pace without timers, GPS, or heart monitors.

Workout Focus

Success in this workout will be determined by your ability to perfectly match all remaining rounds in the same set with the starting interval finishing time. A great result for experienced runners 1-2 seconds per interval. A great results for recreational runners 2-3 seconds per interval. A great result for new runners is 4-5 seconds per interval. Expect to your results to get better as you move deeper into the workout (i.e., the 400s will be easier to pace than the 200s).

Current TimeSet 1: 200m Set 2: 300m Set 3: 400m
1-mile (min:sec)Target TimeTarget TimeTarget Time
5:0037:1755:551:14:34
5:1539:0958:431:18:18
5:3041:071:01:401:22:13
5:4542:571:04:251:25:53
6:0044:461:07:091:29:32
6:1546:371:09:551:33:14
6:3048:281:12:421:36:56
6:4550:241:15:371:40:49
7:0052:141:18:211:44:28
7:1554:041:21:051:48:07
7:3056:021:24:031:52:04
7:4557:521:26:481:55:44
8:0059:411:29:321:59:23
8:151:01:321:32:182:03:04
8:301:03:261:35:102:06:53
8:451:05:151:37:532:10:30
9:001:07:071:40:402:14:14
9:151:09:021:43:322:18:03
9:301:10:501:46:152:21:40
9:451:12:421:49:032:25:24
10:001:14:351:51:522:29:10
10:151:16:321:54:482:33:03
10:301:18:211:57:312:36:41
10:451:20:122:00:182:40:24
11:001:22:062:03:092:44:12
11:151:23:532:05:502:47:46
11:301:25:462:08:392:51:32
11:451:27:402:11:312:55:21
12:001:29:332:14:192:59:05
12:301:33:122:19:493:06:25
13:001:36:562:25:243:13:52
13:301:40:402:31:003:21:19
14:001:44:232:36:353:28:47
14:301:48:072:42:113:36:14
15:001:51:512:47:463:43:42

Originally published by Chris Hinshaw.

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